Feature

Feature

Flo Like Water

March 06, 2016

Florian Nicolaï is one of the most creative riders on the EWS circuit. His unique style threatens the podium at every race he enters. The Maritime Alps are home to some of the most technical tracks in the world, and working on this project over the winter showed us just how good Flo really is.

"This part of the world is the birthplace of Enduro. The Maitime Alps have produced some of the best riders on the planet, like Nico Vouilloz, Fabien Barel, Loic Bruni, and many others. The terrain and the culture make the difference—the trails have been here for centuries and were not made to ride, but to walk. So when you can find the flow here you’re a damn good rider." — Fred Glo, Godfather of Enduro & Owner of Urge bp

"Flo is insane. I don't understand half the stuff he does, but it's fun to watch!" — Jesse Melamed, Rally Team teammate

"Flo is a weirdly fast alien on a bike. He's got creative trail vision, and is one of the first riders coming up to have started out as a pure Enduro racer. Even after two strong EWS seasons taking 5th and 4th place overall, you get the feeling he's hungry for more results. Can't wait to see how this season unfolds." — Brian Park, Rocky Mountain Bicycles

Watch for Flo and the rest of our Rally Team throughout the entire Enduro World Series season. See you on track!

Rider: Florian Nicolaï
Bike: Altitude Rally Edition
Filmed by: Variable Visual, Sébastien Biget, & TS-Drone
Edited & Produced by: Brian Park
Photos by: Matt Wragg
Presented by: Rocky Mountain Bicycles & Urge bp
Supported by: Shimano, Maxxis Tires, Fox Racing Shox, Stan’s NoTubes, Race Face Performance Products, Royal Racing, 7 idp, FTI Consulting, Smith Optics, WTB, OneUp Components, Clif Bar, Evoc, Val d’allos
Music: Azad Right — Son of Sam
Thanks to: Fred Glo, Gaetan Riou, Matt Wragg

Previous News Maiden World Cup Wins Downhill Bike of the Year We're beyond stoked to announce that Decline Magazine has chosen the Maiden World Cup as their 2016 Downhill Bike of the Year!
Next News Video: Carson Storch in Barcelona Our newest freeride team member crosses the pond for warmer temperatures and new spots. Good vibes in this film by Harrison Mendel.
Feature

2 Fat 2 Furious: A Fat Bike Freeride Film

January 29, 2016

We had way too much fun last year shooting our first fat bike freeride video, so we knew we had to do another this year. The goal of 2 Fat 2 Furious was to only ride things that would be harder or impossible on a regular bike. From waist-deep powder to drifty sled tracks to packed down jump lines, the boys achieved just that.

Geoff Gulevich, Wade Simmons, and Noah Brousseau got rad on their Blizzards all winter, and we're excited to show everyone the result.

"We were having fun ripping around on the snowmobile tracks but looking at all the pow chutes surrounding us it was only a matter of time before we were dropping in—we just had to figure out lines that were steep enough to stay afloat!" — Wade Simmons

The whole gang. Our only regret is that Ludacris was too busy to make it out.

Noah Brousseau found out that there are limits to float. Turns out.

Even the Godfather crashes now and then.

This was the first time any of the boys had hit a proper sized drop on a fat bike. Worked out better than expected!

"I was pretty confident on the 3, it was just hard because I was scared to carve off the lip." — Noah Brousseau

Too much fun, now get out there and freeride your fat bike!

Bike: Rocky Mountain Blizzard
Shot at the Coquihalla Lakes Lodge, Kamloops Bike Ranch, and Coastal Mountains, BC
Filmed & Edited by Liam Mullany
Additional Cinematography by Harrison Mendel
Produced by Liam Mullany & Brian Park
Photos by Robb Thompson & Kaz Yamamura
Special Thanks to Cory Leclerc, Bobby Brown at Maxxis, & Eric Simmons
Music: Jet Trash — Baby C'mon

Previous News Getting Fat in Gstaad: Snow Bike Fest 2016 The Swiss Mountains of Gstaad had more than enough snow to make the second edition of Snow Bike Festival a great success.
Next News Farewell to Raphaël Gagné We'd like to thank Raphaël Gagné for his nine seasons of dedication to racing and to our brand. Wish wish you the best in 2016 and beyond!
Feature

A Rocky Mountain Christmas

December 21, 2015

As bike people it's easy to get caught up in our own hype. We all want shiny new stuff, but there's more to this sport than the latest-and-greatest. This Christmas lets be thankful for all friends, all trails, and all bikes.

See you in the mountains, and Love the Ride.

Merry Christmas!

-Rocky Mountain Bicycles

 

Starring Jason Lucas as himself, and Brett Tippie as Santa.
Written by Matt Dennison and Kaz Yamamura.
Cinematography and editing by Matt Dennison.
Narrated by Alex Farnham.
Special thanks to Wendy Dennison, Leo Zuckerman, Zac Moxley, and Cyrel Gonzales.

Previous News Welcome to the Team Carson Storch We are proud to sign Oregon-based slopestyle and big mountain rider Carson Storch to our freeride program. 
Next Media Review Bike Mag's Thunderbolt BC Dream Build Bike Magazine's Brice Minnigh selected our Thunderbolt BC Edition as the platform for his 2016 "Dream Build."
Feature

Launching the Maiden

August 18, 2015

Earlier this month we headed to Retallack Lodge with Thomas Vanderham, Wade Simmons, a bunch of lucky Rocky Mountain staff, and a few key media to officially launch the Maiden.

Arriving in style.

After a quick kool-aid session, we got right to riding.

Rob Potter gets his first taste of Retallack's fast, smashy tracks.

Classic Simmons style.

Night one: egos are crushed at Nageln (aka Hammerschlagen).

From mining ghost towns to old bus graveyards, the Selkirks have a fascinating history.

Simmons brings the vandemonium. And 12 Maidens.

Day two: the best shuttle vehicle ever.

Scotty P aka Pickles touches down on Reco Peak. We supported the Peak 2 Creek trail build here last year, and it was amazing to finally sample it.

Yo dawg, we heard you like Rocky Mountains, so we put your Rocky Mountains on some rocky mountains.

This spring Rocky Mountain product manager Ken Perras crashed and broke three vertebrae, one femur, one hip, his sternum, ten ribs, and punctured a lung. It is amazing to see him back on the bike shredding.

Vanderham was loving the fast, rowdy trails that flowed from the alpine all the way to the lodge.

Night two: we premiered Maiden Voyage, Vanderham's edit with Matt Miles and Anthill films, and toasted the trails with some damn fine whisky. Also, it turns out that Ken is pretty good at Indo board Jenga.

After three days of shredding some of the world's best terrain, eating amazing food, and generally soaking up the lodge life, it was time to drive home and get ready for Crankworx.

We'd like to thank Mike Kinrade and Phil Pinfold at Retallack Lodge, Dean and Ida with Toyota BC, and Margus Riga for the awesome photography.

SEE THE FULL MAIDEN PRESS RELEASE HERE

Previous News Catching Up with Jesse Melamed EWS racer Jesse Melamed sits down with Stan's Notubes to talk racing, injuries, wheels, and his plans for 2016.
Next News Introducing the Maiden Its all-carbon frame was designed from the ground up to perform at the highest levels of World Cup racing, bike park blasting, and big mountain freeriding.
Feature

An Idiot's Guide to Bikepacking on Snow

July 15, 2015

 

Words and Photos by Skyler Des Roches

I have a confession. Before this trip, I'd never actually ridden a fat bike on snow. I'd played around on some sand, and generally felt the worth of fat rubber, but coastal British Columbia is not exactly a prime location for riding bikes on snow. This area is known for steep, glaciated peaks, and bottomless powder, neither of which mix well with fat bikes. Backcountry skis are the tool of choice for moving around the mountains for much of the year.

Sadly, this season let me and many other backcountry skiers down. Record-breaking warm temps and low precipitation meant for a low-powder, low-excitement ski season for all but the most motivated. When that awkward time of the season arrived in late May, when there's still snow in the alpine, but too much bush between there and the trailhead to encourage much skiing, I hadn't had my fill. Rather than turning my attention downward to the prime riding season underway near sea level, I had the novel idea to just go ride on snow.

Knut is a man who enjoys novelty. He seems to derive a sort of sheepish pleasure from putting strange, impractical handlebars on his mountain bike, sewing quirky patches to his gear, smoking a wizard-length tobacco pipe, or eating monstrously large apples – “novelty hand fruit”. He was evidently prepared to overlook the probable outcome – that we'd bushwhack several kilometres with bikes before pushing them a short ways through knee-deep slush – when we came up with a half-baked plan to attempt a ski tour without skis.

After a long drive to the South Chilcotins, our first day of riding met all of our expectations – bushwhacking, bike pushing, bike carrying, and post-holing in slush. We weren't riding the trails that have made this corner of the Coast Mountains famous. No, those were already, almost entirely snow-free and ready for conventional tire sizes. Instead, we followed a forgotten horse trail up Slim Creek, aiming for a snow-covered alpine plateau west of there, and the mellow glaciers beyond. By mid-afternoon we'd climbed above the trees and any sign of a trail. It was immediately clear that we could not ride on the rapidly melting snow.

We relaxed at an early camp, and set alarms for 1:30AM with low expectations. At 2AM, we rode away under a bright moon on a firm, frozen crust. We'd been hoping for this, but were surprised enough by the easy riding that we made the mistake of stopping for a protracted breakfast before the sun was even up. We wouldn't take full advantage of the crust, which didn't form reliably until after 1AM, and lasted only until 7AM, until the following night.

We'd chosen the expansive alpine area at the headwaters of Slim Creek and the Taseko and Lord Rivers for its relative flatness. While I suspected that we could ride down steep slopes, and that our climbing would depend more on our lungs than on tire traction, I was not expecting much success on side-hills. Yet, as we rattled over kilometers of sun-cupped snow, tires aired-down to a few PSI, we held our elevation tightly around the side of valleys, traversing up to twenty degree slopes. A world of possibility unfolded.

If you're motivated by speed, fat bikes are not the best tool. But progression is not all stop watches and slow-mo whirligiging. I ride because of wanderlust. George W. had it wrong; “freedom and democracy” are not delivered from the end of an M16. The bicycle is the best agent of liberation.

I measure my riding with breadth of my mental map. Our faint tracks on the pre-dawn crust become lines on crinkled pages of my cerebral atlas. I've found there to be an inverse correlation with the number of things I have to think about, and the richness of an experience. Too often, gadgets rob us of real living. Nevertheless, it seems that something as wholly material as tire width has a direct effect on the potential to expand my known universe. That's what fat bikes are all about – potential. Not only are there new trails to be ridden, but places with no trails at all. Even slowly pedaling nowhere can be exciting. And has there ever been a bike at Griswold Pass?

I measure my riding with breadth of my mental map. Our faint tracks on the pre-dawn crust become lines on crinkled pages of my cerebral atlas. I've found there to be an inverse correlation with the number of things I have to think about, and the richness of an experience. Too often, gadgets rob us of real living. Nevertheless, it seems that something as wholly material as tire width has a direct effect on the potential to expand my known universe. That's what fat bikes are all about – potential. Not only are there new trails to be ridden, but places with no trails at all. Even slowly pedaling nowhere can be exciting. And has there ever been a bike at Griswold Pass?

Somehow, despite much post-holing, bike pushing, bushwhacking – an overall terrible ratio of riding to hiking – our frustrated exclamations of “No one does this! There's a reason no one brings a bike here!” were quickly shadowed by an immense excitement for where we were. Our mere 90 kilometers covered over four days were not a failure at all, but rather an eye-opening proof of concept. From our turn-around point at Griswold Pass, a gentle glacier climbed further west – a doorway to one of the world's most expansive sub-polar ice fields. And the key to that door might be so simple: just ride at night.

Skyler Des Roches is far from your average medium-adventurer, which you can observe from his blog and Instagram if this article didn't already point that out.

Previous News Introducing the Maiden Its all-carbon frame was designed from the ground up to perform at the highest levels of World Cup racing, bike park blasting, and big mountain freeriding.
Next Feature 2015 BC Bike Race This year's BCBR was one of the toughest years ever. We set-up beer gardens and a kids pool to ease the pain.
Feature

2015 BC Bike Race

July 10, 2015

Words by Scott Pilecki.
Photos by Margus Riga.

BC Bike Race is an undertaking that has to be experienced to be understood. It's more than just riding the trails or entering a race—it’s a life-changing event, and you need every participant to make it that.

Rocky Mountain athlete and BCBR head honcho Andreas Hestler shakes off the nerves for day one in Cumberland.

Geoff Gulevich brought his freeride game, tires, and handlebar-moustache to BCBR.

This year we brought a full roster of XC racers, ambassadors, freeriders, distrubutors, dealers, and friends. Geoff Gulevich left his full-face behind and slathered on the chamois butter. Adventure-loving Tito Tomasi was hemmed in by pink race tape and spandex but swore he would take adventurous lines every day.

Andreane Lanthier Nadeau came off a surprise Hood River Enduro win to show the Solo Women’s category how to descend on an XC bike. Local boy Quinn Moberg had something to prove as one of the youngest racers in this year’s Men’s Solo category. And Kevin Calhoun and Greg Day, who compete against each other in the local race scene, teamed up to take on the Men’s Team category.

This year’s BCBR was one of the toughest in the race’s 9 year history. Technical trail and ribbons of singletrack combined with temperatures in the 30’s challenged racers on all fronts. Each stage showed the character of the town, and how diverse the trails can be across BC's landscape.

Dave Vunic keeps the streets safe as an RCMP officer by day, and ripped it up to 13th place in Men’s Solo.

Christoph Listmann puts the hammer down on the flats.

Powell River was a highlight for us this year. The spectacular campground was on Willington beach for two nights next to the ocean. The trails there exemplified true singletrack racing, snaking brown pow through the sea of green moss. Each stop left its mark on the racers, whether literally or figuratively—there were lots of IV's being hooked up and bandages wrapped.

Kristen Gross showing BC that the California girl can rally the rocks in Squamish.

Quinn Moberg leading out from Sechelt to Langdale.

Michael Anthes in his element.

Our athletes both local and far-reaching couldn’t have made us more proud. After seven days of racing, the team of Greg Day and Kevin Calhoun took the overall win in the Elite Team category. Young gun Quinn Moberg worked hard all week, taking the stage win in his home town of Squamish and finishing the race 4th overall in Solo Men. Andreane Lanthier Nadeau took 4th in the women’s Solo, with Kris Gross hot on her heels in 5th.

How's your game face? Kevin Calhoun putting on a game face clinic from the start line.

Mr. Tito Tomasi. A wildman that is not afraid of grizzly bears or pushing his Thunderbolt BC Edition hard.

The German Bike Mag - Rocky Mountain team of Christoph Listmann and Michael Anthes took 2nd Place in the Veteran Team category. Udo and his brother Harty Bolts finished 2nd in their Team category. Udo raced in the Tour de France, in case the name sounds familiar. And in the Masters Solo Men's Thorsten Keller took the second step.

Race organizer and Rocky Mountain veteran Andreas Hestler rode to an impressive 9th place. Mike Sarnecki took 12th, Dave Vunic 13th, Tito Tomasi in 17th, and Geoff Gulevich 64th—not bad for a guy who normally does backflips not swtichbacks.

Greg Hayes, a veteran of the North Shore, showing he's not yet in the Veteran's category.

Hilscher Manfred wears a dusty grin after another day on course.

Our race mechanics were sweating in the heat to make sure that racers' bikes were in top form each day.

Every photo of ALN sees her smiling. After all it was her birthday on July 3rd, and 2nd place in Whistler on Day 7 served as a nice present.

Our thanks go out to BC Bike Race for having us on as a sponsor of such a great week of riding and impressions. We couldn’t have done it without the help of Fox Racing Shox, Shimano, Stan’s notubes, Smith Optics, Maxxis, WTB, FSA, Honey Stinger, Kicking Horse Coffee, Race Face, FTI Consulting, and IGUS. The event itself could not be done without the long list of volunteers and organizers, thank you for all your help and patience along the way. Especially with our beer garden and kids pool…

Previous Feature An Idiot's Guide to Bikepacking on Snow Skyler Des Roches continues to push the boundarys of where tires make tracks when he and Knut Kitching take a couple of Blizzards into the glaciers and snowy mountain passes of the South Chilcotins in the early Summer, by night.
Next Feature The Black Canyon Trail Wade Simmons, Andreas Hestler, Geoff Gulevich, Alex Cogger, and Brian Vernor head down to Arizona's Black Canyon Trail for some overland bikepacking in the desert.
Feature

The Black Canyon Trail

April 15, 2015

Film by Brian Vernor
Words by Wade Simmons
Photography by Margus Riga

For some, adventure is defined by harrowing near-death experiences. For me, having the intent to adventure is what defines it—even just getting away from civilization for a short while. And with that in mind we organized a trip to Arizona’s Sonoran Desert for an overland bikepacking trip early this spring: three self-supported days on the Black Canyon Trail’s 80 miles of secluded singletrack.

The roll-call included Olympian Andreas Hestler, shiny new tattooed freerider Geoff Gulevich, renowned filmmaker Brian Vernor, Rocky Mountain product guy Alex Cogger, and washed up old freerider Yours Truly. Our first goal was to escape the Pacific Northwest’s winter weather, and our second goal was to test Alex’s fancy new bike design.

We fumbled with our gear for hours in the parking lot of a Prescott motel the night before departure, packing and re-packing, adding and discarding. Ultimately we probably did pack too heavy, but there are the necessities of course: coffee, chocolate, down, wool, and whisky. Fully loaded, our steeds probably tipped the scales at 45+ lbs, and I was less and less sure that this was going to be fun.

There was something liberating in the first few pedal strokes that next morning leaving our drop-off zone, an innocent abandon of responsibility and order that comes with an uncertain weather forecast and only a vague itinerary. Fortunately, the overland bikes performed just as Alex had promised. It was evident in those first few miles that having our houses and kitchens packed along with us wasn’t going to keep us from having fun. It might have been the combination of increased overall mass and over-sized tires, but whatever it was we were having a blast absolutely ripping up the desert terrain on these fully loaded pack-horses—skids, drifts, airs, and all.

The Black Canyon Trail runs roughly 80 miles North to South. Beginning on a high plateau, it winds through rolling grasslands before descending into a landscape of Saguaros, Chollas, and other Sonoran Desert flora. We were treated to chilly nights and frosty desert mornings, but once that sun rose, layers were peeled and we had to contend with the steady, relentless heat of the day. The landscape we encountered was fully alien to us, full of incredibly beautiful things just waiting to stab you the moment you stray from the trail. Between the bullet-holes in everything and the buck-naked rider we ran into on day three, it was clear this trip was about getting weird in the desert.

 

We had been modest in planning our daily mileage expectations, allowing for explorations up various drainages, relaxed lunches by the Agua Fria river, and the necessary sessioning of worthy trail features. Each night however, our camp spot was reached a little later than expected, assembling tents and cooking dinner by the light of our headlamps.

Grizzled old-timers and keyboard adventurers alike might be disappointed by the lack of hardship we encountered—water wasn’t hard to come by, we ate enough, the bikes worked flawlessly, and the dire weather forecast never materialized. But for us, the trip was a complete success. We had a blast, it was an insight into new possibilities, and the best adventures are the ones that inspire future adventures.

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Words by Wade Simmons
Photography by Margus Riga
Film by Brian Vernor
Produced by Brian Park
Music by Brandon O'Connell
Featuring the Rocky Mountain Sherpa
Ridden by Wade Simmons, Geoff Gulevich, Brian Vernor, Alex Cogger, & Andreas Hestler

Presented by Rocky Mountain BicyclesManitou, & Pinkbike.
Supported by Overland JournalArc’teryxPorcelain RocketExped, & Defy Products.
Thanks to Scott Struve, Luke Musselman, Julian Coffey, Christophe Noel, Jo Salamon, Scott Felter, Benoit Deshayes, & Paul Breedlove.

Previous Feature 2015 BC Bike Race This year's BCBR was one of the toughest years ever. We set-up beer gardens and a kids pool to ease the pain.
Next News Introducing the Rocky Mountain Sherpa Designed to carry you and your gear to the ends of the earth, far from the nearest Strava segment.
Feature

Can You Freeride a Fat Bike?

December 22, 2014

We have to admit, we were hesitant about the fat bike trend that's taking the bike industry by storm (pun intended). There were definitely a few raised eyebrows in the office when we started designing and testing one.

Wade Simmons was an instant convert though; "everyone thinks they're so [email protected]#&ing cool and serious, but it's really just about having fun on your bike anyway." And soon enough, the other guys stopped returning their test bikes on time.

FAT FREE came out of a few days of experimenting and shredding the Blizzard in BC's coastal mountains. It opened all our eyes to the spectacular terrain that's available for fat biking, and it proved to us that the only limitations for these bikes are our own preconceived notions.

If it was ever even a question, the answer is yes. You can and should freeride a fat bike.

Riders: Geoff Gulevich, Wade Simmons, & Brett Tippie, with appearances by Andreas Hestler & Fraser Vaage.
Filmed by: Liam Mullany, Connor Macleod, Chris Fisher, Brian Park, Fraser Vaage, & Andreas Hestler
Music (Main): "Outta Mind" by Night Beats, courtesy of The Reverberation Appreciation Society
Thanks to: Black Tusk Snowmobile Club, Tony Cailes, & Dylan Auld
Photography: Fraser Vaage & Brian Park

Visit bikes.com/blizzard to check out the Rocky Mountain Blizzard. We built it for aggressive, trail-style riding on snow, sand, and other soft terrain.

Previous Media Review Bike Mag Lauds Thunderbolt MSL Why did two of Bike Mag's editors pick the Rocky Mountain Thunderbolt 790 MSL BC Edition as their favorite of the 2015 Bible of Bike Tests?
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Feature

The Stoneman

October 15, 2014
 

The Stoneman trail lies in the heart of the Dolomites, the brainchild of former MTB Marathon champion Roland Stauder. Its 120km of singletrack gains over 4000 meters of elevation, a demanding ride even over several days.

Our German office partnered with Stoneman to provide a spectacular route and unique experience. We can't wait to get out there and sample it!

Riders: Roland Stauder, Guido Thaler, and Florian Konietzko

Video: Woodslave Productions

Photos: Markus Greber / BikeAction Germany

Previous News Vintage Signature Wool Jersey We've reached back into the archives for the design of our Vintage Signature mid-weight merino wool jersey.
Next News Rally Team Overall Podium After seven rounds of incredible racing we're massively proud of our young Rocky Mountain Urge bp Rally Team for taking 2nd in the Team category of the Enduro World Series.
Feature

Altitude Sickness — Highs & Lows at EWS #5: Winter Park, Colorado

August 06, 2014

Photography by Matt Wragg. Words by Isabeau Courdurier.

After a season opener in Chile and several races in Europe, the Enduro World Series traveled to the North American continent. At over 10 000 feet of elevation in Winter Park, Colorado, this race promised to be one of the most physically challenging races of the season. Having endured nearly 36 hours of travel hell, the Rocky Mountain Urge bp Rally Team got back together in Denver, but without bikes. Three days before a race, that’s cutting it a little too close for comfort, and the Denver airport had several very pissed off Frenchies in it.

Once in Winter Park, we met the rest of the team: Peter from Alaska, Jordan from Whistler, and Francesco from Chile. Eventually our bikes arrived.

Friday

Warming up normally gives you an idea of how painful a race is going to be, and I was already worried for Stage 1. This flat stage was a massacre for me! The rest of the guys struggled as well, with only Flo and Jesse ranking in the top 30.

On the more technical Stage 2 we made up some time, but at the end of the day our results were still disappointing: Flo in 16th, Jesse in 21st, and Alex and Peter both needing to push harder to break into the top 50.

Saturday

Stage 3 began with a steeper, rocky section that suited me quite well, but it was followed by a long, flat, pedal section where I struggled to maintain the gains I had made. Stage 4 was very short, with no climbs, and I earned my first stage podium of the season - 3rd!

It’s hard to breathe at this altitude, and the terrain is very different from what we are used to racing. While Jesse had a solid day—9th, 14th, and 6th—, both Flo and Alex struggled to maintain their form.

By Stage 5, we were all exhausted. Alex crashed because he “saw two trees when there was only one,” and I slipped back to 7th place on the stage. Despite this, we improved our results as a team today, the toughest day of the race.

Sunday

Stage 6 was a controversial one for racers. Lots of us felt that the flat, smooth, XC course at 10 000 feet was not up to the standard that has been set by the many excellent EWS stages this year. Already out of my element, I missed some tape and ended up going off-course, costing me even more time on this stage. Everyone else was able to push through and maintain their positions.

Finally, the 7th and final stage of the weekend was on Trestle Downhill—by far the most technical and aggressive stage of the weekend! Definitely the best way to end the race. We all have solid runs, with Flo taking 6th, Jesse 10th, Alex 18th, and Jordan 30th. I was really happy with my 7th place on the stage.

After a brutal weekend, our Canadian Jesse was the fastest on the team here with a well-deserved 15th place overall. Going forward it’s clear that our young team needs to strengthen itself to threaten the podium when the races are physical, especially at altitude. We are also gaining experience of how to manage energy and maximize time gains.

Next, we visit Jesse’s hometown of Whistler to enjoy some of the best riding in the world. These two weeks there are going to be full of adventures and fun times, and we’re all looking forward to the Crankworx stop of the Enduro World Series!

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The team rides the Rocky Mountain Altitude MSL Rally Edition, with Shimano components and footwear, Maxxis tires, Stan's NoTubes wheels, Fox premium suspension, and Raceface cockpits. The team wears Urge bp Archi Enduro and Endur-O-Matic helmets, and is also supported by the following key sponsors: Royal Racing Clothing, 7 IDP Protection, WTB Saddles, Smith Optics, Cane Creek headsets, e13 chainguides, Honey Stinger energy gels, Kicking Horse coffee, FTI Consulting, and Val d'Allos ski resort.

Previous News Introducing the 2015 Thunderbolt MSL Marathon racing? Sure. Triple up those whoops? Why not! BC Bike Race? Of course! Smash every corner? Be rude not to.
Next News Gully Storms the Castle Geoff Gulevich was a man on a mission to storm the castle at the 2014 Suzuki Nine Knights in Livigno, Italy.

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